Publisher: Gamecock Media Group

Developer: Auran

Category: Role-Playing

Release Dates

Online - Q4 2007

N Amer - 10/09/2007

Official Game Website

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E3 2007 Preview

A champion of battle, a hero who once was a dominating force on the battlefields, now reincarnated as one of the Chosen and called back to battle again …

That is the core story of Fury, a combat-driven player-versus-player experience fitting into the massively multiplayer space, developed by Auran and published by Gamecock Media Group. This is a game that is easy to jump in and play with an undercurrent that is seemingly complex – once you figure out that just hacking and slashing on the battlefields will not get the job done.

Consider it a bit akin to the PvP of Guild Wars … the combat scenarios are fast paced, and come in two basic forms – single-player free for all and team combat. The single-player combat is more like training for the team game. You earn points by killing the opposition. The one (or team) with the most points at the end wins. As one of the Auran developers stated, it is “Unreal Tournament with a lot of character.”

The game is based in a fantasy world and there are no classes in the game. This means players can visit the various schools and learn the skills they wish. But the skills carried are limited by the slots on the hotbar. There are four schools of study – air, nature, water and fire – and these schools are on diametrically opposed axis, which means some skills will work better against players who are using opposing skills. The dev team stated that this was a little deeper than the typical rock, paper, and scissors combat style. Added to the situation is the fact that scattered throughout the battlefield are power up-type devices, which might mean you can mirror attacks and send some types of damage right back at the caster/attacker.

Ninety percent of all abilities are instant cast. They are not tied to mana. “Mana in MMOs is the fun bar,” one of the dev members stated, “you run out of mana, you run out of fun.”

But do not think that all skills can be cast at any time. There are ranged skills and proximity skills, and some do require that you have enough power built up to cast. Each has a cooling-down timer – though some reset much faster than others.

The sound of the game is generally what one would expect, which the graphics are bright, colorful and (in spite of rampant lag issues throughout most of Santa Monica during this E3), the game ran smoothly in demonstration mode. Add to the fact that the game is so easy to jump in and play, and you have a title that should have appeal to MMO PvP fans. How easy to play? Hmm, well, let’s just say that the first match, without a lot of pre-match instruction, was played with three of the Auran dev team and when time ran out, the reviewer’s character was second overall, having missed winning the match by four points (265-261, with third place down around 180).The second outing was a victory.

It would be silly, though, to think of that success as the hallmark of a game that is overly simple to play. The game was with a character that was well accomplished and had access to a solid base of skills – decisions that players will have to make as they level up, or evolve, their characters during the actual game.

The team match differs from the free-for-all match by the fact that there are loot drops to divvy up for the winning team, and who gets what is determined via a lottery-type system.

While it does have a story, Fury is not going for a deep, story-driven game. Rather, this is a game that knows who the target audience is and goes after that group with a game that looks good, plays well and is a lot of fun. Get ready, all you PvP-happy fans, this is one to look for. The game is slated for an October release, with a massive open beta coming at the end of the month.

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Fury is fast-pace, point-based action for fans of the MMO genre

Reviewer: Michael Lafferty

Review Date: 07/12/2007


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